Legislators: Vote NO on legalizing internet poker

busted flush

Coalition Against Gambling in New York, the New York State Council of Churches and the national organization Stop Predatory Gambling  say to New York State legislators “Vote NO” on S5302 and “NO”  on A 9049A  .

The two bills to legalize certain internet-based poker games (Omaha Hold ’em and Texas Hold ‘em)  look the same.  Both use the same deceptive role-of-skill argument to say the two games are not gambling, thus evading the prohibition against gambling in the State Constitution.

A thought experiment: five robots are programmed at exactly the same very high skill level to play Texas Hold ‘em.  Each has ample cash.  They are gambling.  Pure chance will rule.  In the first hand, one bot will take all.   After  thousands  of  hands,  however, each will still have  about as much as the others.  This is in  game theory a “fair game.”

Now downgrade the skill levels of four ‘bots so that one scarcely knows the relative values of different hands, while the other three are each in its own stratum of skill between beginner and tournament champion.  After many hands the bottom ‘bot will have been cleaned  out.  After  hundreds  of hands,  the supreme robot will have pocketed much more than the others.  After  thousands  it will have cleaned them out,  too.

In the second scenario disparities in skill skewed the distribution of winnings,  but in both the robots are gambling,   playing the same game by the same rules as in the first scenario.

The only way to consistently make money in poker is to play with people you outclass who don’t know how much better you are.  Gambling in “games” whose outcomes are not  (like slot machines or roulette)  due to pure chance sets the stage for money to flow to  the more skilled from  the less skilled.  This is the stage for hustle and fleecing.

Besides the prevarication that i-poker is not gambling,  the twin bills share a set of supposed safeguards that look good on paper.  Nothing is said about stringency or enforcement.

If internet poker is not gambling, why would licenses be granted only to racinos or class III casinos?

Could the  paradoxical restriction be to avoid opposition to the bill from the bricks and mortar gambling sector?

S5302  and A9049A  are pushed by companies wanting  to make money from New Yorkers  and  to sustain the  sharks who target New York i-poker players.  The  two bills are to sell high-cost hustling licenses that will hurt  New Yorkers.

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From the Front Lines Against Predatory Gambling

Nelson Acquilano photoA Stop Predatory Gambling National Day of Action in Geneva NY 26 September 2015 was co-sponsored by  CAGNY, Women’s Interfaith Institute, Geneva Assembly of God “Celebrate Recovery,” Phelps Baptist Church, and Concerned Citizens of Seneca County (CCSC).       Nelson Acquilano. LMSW, MPA, MA gave the audience his views on the untrue assertion that making  predatory gambling more convenient benefits the community and the region.  Mr Acquilano (pictured) is on the Board  of Directors of CAGNY.

” My name is Nelson Acquilano. Many of you know me because of the work I have done in the Finger Lakes and because of the many different human service groups and agencies I have worked with over these past 40 years.

We have a terrible problem in New York. Our families, our communities are in great crisis. But this is not an economic problem. No, New York has a Quality of Life Problem… and it is a real crisis for our families and our community.  It will only further decline if we allow it.

New York has a high rate of crime…. a high rate of divorce, high rates of child abuse, academic underachievement, teen pregnancy, and drug abuse.….. our jails are full, our schools are faltering, and our families are failing. Now given this background, the introduction of gambling in New York is contra-indicated.

Given these community problems, to allow a known environmental carcinogen such as gambling into an otherwise delicately balanced community… to take a powerful risk factor, a known risk factor — and allow it to flourish will only further undermine the healthy families and healthy communities we are trying to build and maintain.

Gambling is one of the most destructive dynamics that can be introduced into a community, and when it is – it spreads like a cancer – like an epidemic, leaving broken lives, broken families, and broken communities in its path.

All states that have legalized gambling have found subsequent dramatic increases not only in the incidence of compulsive gamblers, but in crime, family dysfunction, divorce, bankruptcy, and mental illness. But by then it’s too late. Once legalized, communities cannot reverse the trend and control the increase in the gambling addiction and negative consequences.

Compulsive gambling leads to many thousands of personal and family bankruptcies each year. It leads to lost homes, broken families, lost savings accounts, lost college funds, and to a dramatic increase in crime including embezzlement at business. It is strongly correlated with mental illness, and also seriously affects the spouse, children, parents, and friends of the problem gambler.

Some states have reported that divorce tripled after the introduction of casinos. Others reported an explosion in domestic violence.

Other research shows that gambling is indirectly subsidized by the taxpayers. For every dollar that gambling contributes in taxes, it usually costs the taxpayers at least 3 dollars (and higher numbers have been calculated) because of major increases in the welfare system, mental health system, and the criminal justice system. The ultimate cost in broken families and disintegrated communities from gambling never even comes close to justifying it as a means to raise revenue.

Gambling is exploding across America but America is not ready for the consequences.

The National Council on Problem Gambling has found that pathological gamblers have a suicide rate twenty times higher than non-gamblers.

Now if we could stop an epidemic – something that would destroy tens of thousands of families wouldn’t we have an imperative – a compelling moral and ethical responsibility to serve and protect our families?

And that is why I am against gambling anywhere in New York State, but especially in the Finger Lakes. Studies show that the negative consequences impact not just upon the host community, but all communities within a 50 mile radius…. the region I have served for the last 40 years. Gambling is simply the worst strategy for a delicate community.

I would like to leave you with a few final points:

1) It never ceases to amaze me how the moral and ethical implications of gambling are so easily dismissed. When I see casino owners say that the future of gambling is with our youth and we need to have more youth gamble, when I see a casino that comes out and targets women to get more women to gamble, when I see a casino develop a youth program to get more college students to the tables….. then I need to question the morality of that entire industry.

In fact, one college Chaplin told me he is increasingly experiencing college students with a high percent of gambling issues – losing their tuition and room and board monies.

And by the way, a couple of years ago, researcher Natasha Schull who wrote the book “Addiction by Design” was in Rochester. She explained how the gambling industry models psychological experiments on rats for behavior modification techniques on humans, to increase time – and money spent – sitting and playing at slot machines.

She explained extensive studies on Time-on-Device, on algorithms of “Intermittent Positive Reinforcement”, and on how the gambling industry studies the best variance of high-frequency low payout wins and low-frequency high payout wins to keep you gambling. These are some of the strongest shapers of human behavior.

And today’s slot machines are actually learning your preferred method of play….. it hasn’t reached the level of artificial intelligence yet, but according to Natasha… the machines are studying YOU.

There are some 30 organizations opposed to casino gambling in New York, including:- The Institute for American Values

The New Yorkers Family Research Foundation

        and
–   the Roman Catholic Church

– the Episcopal Church

– the United Methodist Church…

– the Baptists….
– the Interfaith Impact of New York State, and

– the New York State Council of Churches!

The Catholics….. Methodists, Baptists and Episcopal Churches are all publicly on record as denouncing the expansion of gambling…..   and I don’t know about you… but I prefer to listen to them for my spiritual health and wellness.

2) Second, the gambling industry follows a business model – that model is all about growth and expansion….. to survive, profits need to grow, which means more and newer ways to gamble… and more and newer ways to get non-gamblers to the table.

At the Senate Hearing one gambling company was asked if they are concerned about the proliferation and saturation of gambling, and their response was “no”, that is not a concern of ours.

Well let me say that it is a concern of ours! And it is already happening. There are all types of efforts to expand gambling throughout New York State. We’ve opened Pandora’s Box.

There is one Italian City, Pavia, that has so much gambling, that it has surpassed most every other city for debt, bankruptcies, depression, domestic violence and broken homes.
It is devastating to the community, and now the people said they have had enough and are trying to pass legislation to curb gambling.

3) And third, if you take a look at the true voting outcome for Proposition I, even with all the manipulation and irregularities to get the voters to vote for it….. Proposition I was voted DOWN in the central Finger Lakes region:

If you include….. Ontario County, Cayuga County, Monroe, Onondaga, Schuyler, Seneca, Wayne and Yates Counties….. 125,031 voted to pass Prop I, but over 126,648 voted against it!

Developers wanted to put a casino in Rochester, but the people defeated it….. they wanted to put a casino in Syracuse, and the people defeated that…. And now they are trying to put one here in the Finger Lakes….

I believe that local citizens groups should be honored, not demonized, for their fight against a proposed casino.

You know, Governor Cuomo accepted some $715,000 from the gambling industry prior to changing the constitution, although he did not include gambling in his pre-election platform. According to Common Cause, over $47 million had been spent on lobbying and campaign contributions to other senators and assemblymen by the gambling industry prior to the changing of the NYS Constitution.

And there have been other discrepancies and irregularities, even with Proposition I itself.

I have reviewed over 100 gambling studies and articles, and I have yet to find one that says that gambling helps to build positive youth development. I have yet to see one that says that gambling supports healthy families. I have yet to see one that says that gambling builds strong communities… in fact, they all say exactly the opposite.

When local groups t recognize the real environmental impact – the human costs, and decide to commit themselves to fight such a devastating dynamic as casinos present, then I applaud their work….. and ask our representatives to remember that the fundamental purpose of public service is for the health, safety and welfare of our residents… and there is nothing about gambling that supports the health, safety and welfare of the people.

Thank you.”

Permission is hereby given to reproduce the words of the above text in whole or part as long as the above permalink is cited and Nelson Acquilano is credited as author.

NYS-based Civil Society Organizations Opposed to Gambling Expansion

Watkins Gen, New York, October 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the November 5 referendum on casino gambling nears, Coalition  Against  Gambling in New York  (CAGNY)  is often asked “who’s with you?”   In  response we provide here a guide  to  non-profit organizations in New York State divided  into two sections  according to their position on government-sanctioned gambling.   These organizations are not formally members of our coalition. It consists of  individuals,  who may represent informally an organization.  Some of  the organizations listed below work  closely with us; others at arm’s length.  Some have a few members; the larger, denominational,  ones have hundreds of thousands among them.   We are privileged to all be aligned at this crucial time and beyond. This guide is not complete, but we believe the assemblage here represents well the spirit of New York State.

Oppose  gambling   expansion

Catholic  Conference September 2013

The Archdiocese of  New York  published the  statement of the Conference of Bishops as an editorial in Catholic New York  3 October 2013  

Council on Alcoholism and Addictions of the  Finger Lakes,  Geneva

Council on Addictions of  New York State,  Oneonta

Erie County Council for the Prevention of Alcohol and Substance Abuse. Buffalo

Institute for American Values, New York

LEAF Council on Alcoholism and Addictions,  Oneonta

Prevention Network of Central New York, Syracuse

Seaway Prevention Council, Ogdensburg

Steuben Council on Addictions, Bath

 

Urge a “NO” vote on   “Proposal  1”  to legalize 7 new  casinos

Casino-Free Sullivan County, Woodbourne   contact  joanthursh@gmail.com

Catskill Mountain Keeper, Youngsville

Citizens Against Casino Gambling in Erie County (CACGEC), Buffalo contact joelrose@buffalo.edu

Coalition  Against  Gambling in New York (CAGNY), Buffalo

Conservative Party of New York State,  Brooklyn

Statement  of  the Right  Reverend William Love,  Bishop of  the Episcopal Diocese of Albany,   Greenwich

Statement of the Right Reverend Lawrence Provenzano, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, Garden City

Statement  of  the Right Reverend Andrew Dietsche, Bishop of the   Episcopal Diocese of New York,   New York

Statement  of  The Rt. Rev. Prince G. Singh VIII , Episcopal Bishop of Rochester can be requested by an e-mail to the Bishop.

Interfaith Alliance of  Rochester

Interfaith Impact of New York State,  Albany

New York State Council of Churches, Albany  read  statement here

New Yorker’s Family Research Foundation,   Spencerport

New Yorkers for Constitutional Freedoms, Spencerport

Network of Religious Communities, Buffalo

No Casino 1000 Islands, Wellesley Island contact  cwellinshphs@yahoo.com

Saratogians Against More Casinos in Our Town contact

No Saugerties Casino, Saugerties

Partnership for the Public Good, Buffalo

Sustainable Saratoga, Saratoga Springs

United Methodist Church, New York  Annual  Conference , White Plains

United Methodist Church, Upper New York  Annual  Conference ,  Syracuse

VOICE- Buffalo  contact france@buffalo.edu

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Photo of Watkins  Glen NY from flickr creative commons “looking-up-the-sky” 4002696878_b439720a72.jpg

list compiled by CAGNYEDITOR,  who is responsible for any errors.

 

NYS Council of Churches: No on Prop. 1

Statement of the  Rev. Dr. Paula Gravelle, Executive Director, New York State Council of Churches    Oct 28, 2013

The New York State Council of Churches has long opposed casino gambling, and we stand in opposition to Proposal 1.  The stated purposes of this amendment are to promote job growth, increase funding to schools, and permit local governments to lower property taxes.  However, in places where casino gambling has been introduced, any actual gains have come at the high cost of addiction, family disintegration, and deepening poverty.  There are no quick fixes to the challenges of struggling cities and towns, and we call on our elected officials instead to focus on the kind of investment and hard work that will build sound, long-term economic health and self-sufficiency for New York’s communities.

transmitted by e-mail from the Rev. Dr. Gravelle to Coalition Against Gambling in New York.   The address of NYSCOC is 1880 Central Avenue Albany, NY, 12205                     518 436 9319                             nyscoc@aol.com