“Treatment” and “Prevention” of Problem Gambling: 2 little, 2 late

4376727123_8fc3fb172dfrom flickr cc

4376727123_8fc3fb172dfrom flickr cc

photo retitled                                               “Contemplation”

Letter  to the Editor of Legislative Gazette, Albany NY,  published Feb 12 

To the Editor:                                                                             Feb 6 2013

Members of the Coalition Against Gambling in New York came to Albany on Feb 5 to express our views to legislators against amending the State Constitution to legalize “no more than seven casinos.”   We were heartened to see in the “Other Voice”  section  an article from the Syracuse Post-Standard  headed “Social cost of gambling outweighs revenue gained.”  It treats the proposed expansion of Quick Draw, but the header applies as well to the Governor’s proposal  for more casinos.  We hope it will resound in the corridors of power.

Page 8 has an article by the Gazette’s Josefa Velasquez about the efforts  of  Assemblymember Cymbrowitz to “address the potential dangers”  of  “increase[d ] gambling opportunities “ by “investment of resources”   “in programs  … effective… in reducing  … problem gambling, as well as evidence-based prevention programs that aim to reduce the risk of individuals engaging in addictive behavior.”  Mr. Cymbrowitz  is sincere in his desire to help, but we believe on the wrong track.  In Kansas, where for a population a tenth the size of New York’s the state allocates more than twice as much funding to  treatment and prevention of problem gambling,  a recent report concluded  that only 0.5 % of the estimated 24,000 pathological gamblers in the state were in a state-funded treatment program.   I note that  the 24,000 figure actually underestimates the prevalence  of  pathological and problem gambling combined.

Mr.  Cymbrowitz, in a hearing he convened 20 December 2012, stated that there are close to a million NYS residents with a gambling problem.  A witness at the hearing estimated that only 5000 individuals in NYS are in state-funded treatment currently.   5,000/1,000,000 = 0.5%.  If  treatment  in KS, with twenty times the per capita  allocation,  does not  penetrate deeper  than  it does in NY,  a responsible society cannot depend  on treatment of problem gambling , no matter how effective  it can be for individuals.  We must rely much more on an environmental strategy for primary prevention:  don’t expand gambling “opportunities.”   Our state has more than enough now. 

s/ Stephen Q. Shafer MD MPH Chairperson Coalition Against Gambling in NY

PG Tx Enrollments FY12KansasStudy Kansas report

12-20-12 Alcohol and Drugs Transcript Assembly Hearing Trasncript

 

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